OIES

The Oxford Institute for Energy Studies was founded in 1982 as an autonomous centre for advanced research into the social science areas of energy issues. The Institute is committed to the idea of dialogue – between consumers and producers, government and industry and academics and decision makers. This is reflected in the membership of the Institute and in the composition of its research team, which is drawn from different national, academic and professional backgrounds.

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                    [post_content] => In this latest Oxford Energy podcast James Henderson and Vitaly Yermakov discuss Vitaly’s forthcoming paper on Russia’s gas supply surplus. It has been widely documented that Gazprom has had 100bcm or more spare gas for potential export to Europe, but recent increases in production have reduced this figure. In addition, Vitaly outlines his concern that, although the surplus is available on an annual basis, Gazprom may have much less room for manoeuvre on a seasonal basis, especially on very cold days in winter.
                    [post_title] => Oxford Energy Podcast - Russia's gas supply surplus
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                    [post_content] => China’s “War against Air Pollution” has seen considerable action from the Chinese government over the last few Chinese five year plans, initially focussing on SO2 and NOX with the later plans addressing particulate pollution. In this fascinating interview, Akira Miyamoto & Chikako Ishiguro, Visiting Authors at the OIES, discuss the measures taken against air pollution in China since the late 2000s, how successful the Chinese actions plans have been to reduce emissions as well as gas demand and pricing in China.  Discussions also include how the rise in Chinese gas and LNG import requirements drove Asian prices so high in the winter of 2017/18 as well as the  future potential for additional LNG and gas pipeline imports in the future.
                    [post_title] => Oxford Energy Podcast - Outlook for LNG in China towards 2020: War against Air Pollution
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                    [post_content] => Over the last four years, major and rapid developments have been taking place in Egypt’s natural gas market to reverse the country’s indigenous gas production decline and manage its unabated gas demand growth. In this podcast David Ledesma interviews Mostefa Ouki, Senior Research Fellow at the Institute, to discuss the Egyptian gas market. During the interview Mostefa discusses how key government policy measures helped bring about the discovery and fast-track development of the giant Zohr gas field in 2015 as well as other fields that are expected to result in the doubling of Egypt’s natural gas output by the early 2020s. Egypt, as a major regional energy player, is also aiming at becoming a leader in future regional natural gas projects in the Eastern Mediterranean and is seeking to create a regional gas hub.

The podcast also discusses Egypt’s domestic gas market and how, in 2014, the Egyptian government initiated much needed price adjustments to reduce or eliminate gas price subsidies, especially for non-power consumers. Indiscriminate price subsidies had previously fuelled persistent internal gas demand growth during the previous two decades that led to an unsustainable financial situation. A new gas market law, issued in 2017, followed by an implementation decree in 2018, established a gas market regulatory authority that set about a fundamental restructuring of Egypt’s domestic natural gas market.  These have changed the regulatory landscape for natural gas in the country, which should lead to a more sustainable natural gas balance in the longer-term.
                    [post_title] => Oxford Energy Podcast - Is Egypt undergoing a natural gas renaissance?
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                    [post_content] => This issue of the Oxford Energy Forum looks at the future of gas from different perspectives. Future development of decarbonised gases – biogas, biomethane and hydrogen – and the consequences for gas networks. The importance of reducing methane emissions from the gas chain. Progress towards reducing the costs of liquefaction and the affordability of gas and LNG imports, particularly in low income countries. The potential for gas to penetrate new markets and specifically the marine transport sector. And the enduring issue of security of supply as a potential constraint on the future of the fuel.
                    [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - The Future of Gas - Issue 116
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                    [post_content] => The growing level of interest displayed in LNG as a marine fuel, driven by both environmental restrictions and economic attractiveness, means usage is certain to grow. There is, however, less certainty over the pace and scale of demand growth.

In this podcast David Ledesma has a telephone interview with Chris Le Fevre, Senior Visiting  Research Fellow at the OIES, to discuss his recent paper “A review of demand prospects for LNG as a marine fuel”.

The discussion centres on the main factors driving LNG demand in the marine sector and the most promising sectors for LNG in global shipping markets. It also discusses the issue of LNG refuelling infrastructure and its impact on market development and the validity of current demand forecasts.
                    [post_title] => Oxford Energy Podcast - LNG in marine transport -  is it about to become the environmentally-friendly fuel of choice?
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                    [post_content] => This issue of the Oxford Energy Forum focuses on the electrification of Africa, especially sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Due to significant expected population growth, the number of Africans without electricity access in 2030 may not fall much from today’s level of about 600 million, which is about 60 per cent of the world’s current population without access to electricity. The articles cover a wide variety of countries and issues, focusing on barriers to meeting electrification objectives and ways to overcome them.
                    [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - Electrifying Africa - Issue 115
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                    [post_date] => 2018-06-29 10:45:32
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                    [post_content] => The energy landscape is changing rapidly with far-reaching implications for global energy industries and actors, including oil companies and oil-exporting countries. A key issue facing oil companies and oil-exporting countries is how they should now position themselves and how best to be part of the renewables ‘revolution’. In this podcast David Ledesma interviews Rob West, Head of Global Energy Research at Redburn and Research Associate at the OIES, to discuss his recent paper “The rise of renewables and energy transition: what adaptation strategy for oil companies and oil-exporting countries” which he jointly authored with Bassam Fattouh, Director of the OIES and Rahmatallah Poudineh, Lead Senior Research Fellow at the OIES.  The discussion centres on the falling cost of renewables and how companies and countries should invest in renewables in parallel to hydrocarbons, thus in many cases, freeing up hydrocarbons for export.  It also addresses how companies should ensure that they can attract sufficient capital to meet the energy needs and how investing counter-cyclically can build a company’s portfolio for future growth.
                    [post_title] => Oxford Energy Podcast - The rise of renewables and energy transition
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                    [post_date] => 2018-06-15 11:04:23
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                    [post_content] => The DG COMP investigation into Gazprom’s activities in Central and Eastern Europe has been running since 2011 but has recently come to a conclusion. In this Oxford Energy podcast Jonathan Stern and Katja Yafimava discuss the outcome and the implications both for Gazprom’s business in Europe and for the European gas market as a whole. In particular they assess the pricing methodology that Gazprom has now agreed to adopt, as well as other concessions which the company has made that should help to improve the free flow of gas in Europe but may also improve the competitive position of Russian gas on the continent.
                    [post_title] => Oxford Energy Podcast - Implications of the DG COMP investigation into Gazprom
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                    [post_content] => Oxford Energy Forum 104 (February 2016) looked at the transformation under way in the electricity sector, driven by technological developments and policies on decarbonization. It focused mainly on OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries, and on Europe in particular, where there are major challenges, ranging from the practical issues associated with the integration of the new intermittent renewable sources to the wider policy question of whether there is a fundamental conflict between two objectives – decarbonization and liberalization – to which these countries are committed. This issue of the Forum explores related issues, but on a wider canvas – countries across the world, with a diverse range of approaches, many outside the OECD.
                    [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - Decarbonization and liberalization in the power sector: international perspectives - Issue 114
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                    [post_content] => In this latest Oxford Energy podcast Anupama Sen, a Senior Research Fellow at OIES, is in conversation with James Henderson on the subject of recent changes in Indian upstream taxation and the potential impact on the Indian gas market. The Indian government has set out an ambitious target to reduce energy imports by increasing domestic production, which could also encourage a greater use of gas in the domestic energy economy. To date progress has been slow, and this podcast explores the potential for an acceleration over the next five years driven by investment in domestic production.
                    [post_title] => Oxford Energy Podcast - Indian upstream taxation and the potential impact on the Indian gas market
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                    [post_content] => This issue of the Oxford Energy Forum is devoted to analysing the role of oil benchmarks, their evolution over time, the challenges facing the most established benchmarks, and the extent to which the current transformations in oil market fundamentals and crude trade flows as well as changes in the regulatory environment are likely to result in the emergence of new benchmarks and new crude oil pricing systems.

 
                    [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - Oil Benchmarks - Issue 113
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                    [post_content] => This issue of the Oxford Energy Forum is devoted to investigating disruptive change in the transport sector. There are three forces shaping or disrupting the road transport sector, namely: autonomous vehicles, transport electrification, and shared mobility. The interactions between the three will determine the future of energy use in transport. The determinants of these three disruptors include factors such as government policies, technological advances, infrastructure, battery costs, material supply chains, consumer behaviour,
and the development of alternative
fuels. The articles in this issue analyse in detail each of the three disruptors and their associated drivers and constraints, presenting a range of views on the future of transport and energy use.
                    [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - Disruptive Change in the Transport Sector - Issue 112
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                    [post_date] => 2018-03-22 14:21:59
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                    [post_content] => After a volatile 12 months for LNG freight rates, James Henderson, Director of the OIES Gas Programme, and Howard Rogers, the Programmes Chairman, discuss Howard’s recent paper ‘The LNG Shipping Forecast’. Their conversation ranges from a review of the recent trends in LNG shipping rates to a debate about Howard’s new model for shipping costs and his thoughts on the future economic cost of LNG shipping to the European and Asian markets from various key producer locations.
                    [post_title] => Oxford Energy Podcast
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                    [post_date] => 2018-03-12 13:44:04
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                    [post_content] => In this Oxford Energy Podcast David Ledesma interviews Anouk Honore, Senior Research Fellow at the OIES, about the current challenges taking place in gas supply from the Dutch Groningen gas field. The interview discusses the recent earthquakes in the Groningen area of the Netherlands and their impact on the gas production caps on Dutch gas supply. Anouk also explores the wider impact of the gas supply cuts on Northern Europe that could effect 15 million residential gas buyers in Belgium, France and Germany. The interview concludes by discussing the impact of reduced gas supply on European Security of Supply.


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                    [post_date] => 2018-02-05 11:52:50
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-02-05 11:52:50
                    [post_content] => In this Oxford Energy Podcast David Ledesma interviews James Henderson, the Director of the Gas Programme at OIES, about his recent paper on developments at the Gas Exchange in St. Petersburg. Written in collaboration with Tatiana Mitrova at the Skolkovo Energy Centre in Moscow, the paper looks at the history of gas trading in Russia, the current state of the Exchange in St. Petersburg and the challenges facing SPIMEX as it seeks to develop a fully liquid trading hub. The outcome, it would seem, is fairly binary – either the exchange will catalyse significant change in the Russian gas sector, or it could fade into obscurity.


                    [post_title] => Oxford Energy Podcast
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                    [post_name] => oxford-energy-podcast-5
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                    [post_modified] => 2018-02-05 11:52:50
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            [15] => WP_Post Object
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                    [ID] => 30824
                    [post_author] => 111
                    [post_date] => 2018-01-17 13:00:42
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-01-17 13:00:42
                    [post_content] => The Oxford Institute for Energy Studies held a Work​shop – the first of a series – on ‘Disruptive Change in the Transport Sector’ in relation to its impact on energy use in private transport. Participants included experts from the energy, auto, mobility, and technology sectors. This document summarises eight key takeaways from the Workshop discussions:
  1. Despite many government announcements and strong press coverage regarding vehicle electrification, there are alternative technologies which are also important for future mobility.
  2. Level 5 Autonomous Vehicles are still some years away, and will be context-specific.
  3. Cost is one among multiple factors in the scaling up of batteries.
  4. Grid management is critical to electric vehicle (EV) adoption.
  5. Automobile manufacturers will need to restructure their business models around value creation.
  6. Technology diffusion goes beyond cost-competitiveness.
  7. Emerging markets will also adopt EVs, driven primarily by government policy – but outcomes will differ.
  8. Automation, electrification and shared mobility imply very different types of impacts in different combinations.
[post_title] => Disruptive Change in the Transport Sector - Eight Key Takeaways [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => disruptive-change-transport-sector-eight-key-takeaways [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-17 13:00:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-17 13:00:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/?post_type=publications&p=30824 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [16] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30809 [post_author] => 111 [post_date] => 2018-01-08 10:42:45 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-01-08 10:42:45 [post_content] => Issue 111 of the Oxford Energy Forum focuses on the potential outcomes and impact of US energy policy over the next four years, both for the US domestic economy and for international energy markets. The advent of the Trump Administration has marked a dramatic reversal of previous US energy policy, including on regulation, clean energy, and US commitments under the Paris Agreement. Despite this, the emerging consensus from the issue is that markets, rather than US domestic policy, will continue to play the dominant role in shaping outcomes. More difficult to predict, however, is the potential impact that trade protectionism and an inward-looking foreign policy may have on the functioning of international energy markets.   [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - What's Next for US Energy Policy? - Issue 111 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-forum-next-us-energy-policy-issue-111 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-08 10:48:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-08 10:48:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/?post_type=publications&p=30809 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [17] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30800 [post_author] => 111 [post_date] => 2018-01-03 10:30:45 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-01-03 10:30:45 [post_content] => In this fourth OIES Energy Podcast Jonathan Stern discusses his latest paper on the future of gas in the global energy economy, entitled “Challenges to the Future of Gas: unburnable or unaffordable?”. In conversation with David Ledesma, Professor Stern reviews his hypothesis that while the gas industry needs to have a decarbonisation strategy if it is to prosper in the long term in Europe, in many other parts of the world the issue is price. In particular, in non-OECD countries gas is viewed as an expensive energy option, and although it can help to alleviate air quality problems in some cities, it needs to be affordable if demand is to grow in line with optimistic forecasts. The implication for LNG producers is that they must get costs down if a new wave of projects is to be developed. [post_title] => Oxford Energy Podcast [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-podcast-4 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-03 10:32:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-03 10:32:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/?post_type=publications&p=30800 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [18] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30774 [post_author] => 111 [post_date] => 2017-12-12 12:16:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-12 12:16:11 [post_content] => Tricia Curtis, a research associate at OIES and founder of consultancy Petronerds, discusses the recent trends in US shale oil production, based on her recent paper for OIES. Tricia reviews the key basins for shale oil production and assesses the impact of technological developments on the productivity of new wells. She reviews the potential for continued advances across a number of drilling, completion and production activities, and discusses the breakeven oil price in the various shale plays. She also assesses the key challenges ahead for the US shale industry and outlines her thoughts on the likely production levels that can be achieved over the next 2-3 years. [post_title] => Oxford Energy Podcast [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-podcast-3 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-13 14:36:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-13 14:36:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/?post_type=publications&p=30774 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [19] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30741 [post_author] => 111 [post_date] => 2017-11-21 10:59:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-21 10:59:17 [post_content] => Michal Meidan, a research associate at OIES and leading China analyst at Energy Aspects, discusses the current state of the Chinese gas market and the prospects for future growth. The recent rebound in LNG demand in China and the renewed government focus on air quality and the environment has encouraged a more positive view of the future for gas in the Chinese energy economy. Michal discusses the reasons for the upturn in gas demand, the impact of government policy on coal-to-gas switching, the prospects for indigenous Chinese gas production and the balance of Chinese gas exports. She also assesses the need for price and institutional reform and the likelihood of China achieving its targets for gas demand in 2020 and 2030. [post_title] => Oxford Energy Podcast [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-podcast-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-13 14:36:59 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-13 14:36:59 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/?post_type=publications&p=30741 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [20] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30701 [post_author] => 111 [post_date] => 2017-10-26 14:24:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-26 13:24:20 [post_content] => In the first of our OIES Energy Podcast series David Ledesma interviews Tatiana Mitrova, an OIES Visiting Research Fellow, on the topic of Russian Gas. They discuss Gazprom’s export strategy, the current state of the domestic market in Russia, the politics of Russian gas in Europe and the potential impact of Russian gas on the global energy market. [post_title] => Oxford Energy Podcast [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-podcast [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-12 12:31:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-12 12:31:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/?post_type=publications&p=30701 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [21] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30650 [post_author] => 111 [post_date] => 2017-09-25 11:10:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-25 10:10:41 [post_content] => The expectation of an oversupplied gas market up to the mid-2020s has put natural gas demand back on the radar. This edition of the Oxford Energy Forum is dedicated to gas demand outlook in various regions of the world, with the starting point being the open question on whether, when, where and, eventually, at what price there will be sufficient demand to absorb the coming LNG wave. The first ten articles investigate the challenges and expectations for future gas demand in the main importing regions: Europe, Asia and South-East Asia, the MENA region and South America. Because it is difficult to draw common conclusions even at the regional level for diverse group of counties, authors provide separate views on key markets and there are three articles that specifically focus on Turkey, China and India. Following on from that, two articles consider the potential for new gas and LNG markets, with a focus on the particular case of the Ivory Coast and the role of FSRUs. The subsequent article focuses on the prospects for gas as a transport fuel as scarcely a day goes by without an announcement of new investments in shipping or refuelling facilities, or the conclusion of a cooperation agreement. Last but not least, the final article explores the relationship between coal and gas and what could be the key catalyst for coal-to-gas switching in the various regions. [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - Searching for Natural Gas Demand in the Next Decade - Issue 110 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-forum-searching-natural-gas-demand-next-decade-issue-110 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-25 11:10:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-25 10:10:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/?post_type=publications&p=30650 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [22] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30573 [post_author] => 111 [post_date] => 2017-08-15 10:02:40 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-15 09:02:40 [post_content] => This issue of the Oxford Energy Forum is devoted to Mexico’s recent energy sector reforms. The reforms were designed to open up the country’s energy sector to international and local private players, inject competition, provide new partnering opportunities for PEMEX, establish new markets domestically, and potentially strengthen Mexico as a key link between the American and international markets for energy trade. However, these landmark reforms – which have significant implications for the country’s overall economy and the role of Petróleos Mexicanos (PEMEX), the state oil company that hitherto dominated its energy sector – are also not entirely without wider economic implications which need to be carefully considered as the country moves forward. This issue presents a spectrum of views on energy sector reforms in a country that continues to be important to both the regional and international energy systems.   [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - Mexican Energy Reforms - Issue 109 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-forum-mexican-energy-reforms-issue-109 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-15 10:02:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-15 09:02:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/?post_type=publications&p=30573 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [23] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30440 [post_author] => 111 [post_date] => 2017-06-08 11:08:51 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-06-08 10:08:51 [post_content] => This Insight published by the Emirates Diplomatic Academy (EDA) is the outcome of a joint workshop between the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies (OIES) and EDA and draws on ideas and data presented by Dr Bassam Fattouh during the workshop. The insight examines how global energy markets are evolving, what this could mean for Gulf oil exporters, and how these countries could respond. The workshop identified ten structural trends that are expected to be largely responsible for shaping global energy markets over the next two decades and analysing their implication on Gulf exporters. These are: 
Acceleration of shift in oil demand away from the OECD to non-OECD; Shifts in oil demand patterns within non-OECD Asia; Continuing role of US shale oil as a ‘new’, nimble source of supply; Shift in oil trade flows from ‘East to East’ and from ‘West to East’; Possibility of the US/North America becoming a net oil and natural gas exporter; Changing relations within OPEC countries; 
Growing relevance of Russia-OPEC relations; 
Changing nature of geopolitical risks affecting the oil market; 
Shift in oil market perceptions from oil scarcity to oil abundance; and 
high uncertainty regarding the impact of technological developments and climate change policies on future oil demand.   [post_title] => Global Trends in Oil and Energy: Implications for the GCC and Foreign Policy Responses [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => global-trends-oil-energy-implications-gcc-foreign-policy-responses [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-06-08 11:08:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-08 10:08:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/?post_type=publications&p=30440 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [24] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30291 [post_author] => 111 [post_date] => 2017-04-19 10:23:13 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-19 09:23:13 [post_content] => It has been nearly three years since the collapse in global oil prices and there have been mixed outcomes for countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). While some countries (which had already initiated reforms) benefited from the low oil price, in others it triggered a spate of pricing reforms following fiscal crises. Although there is now an unequivocal consensus over the necessity for these reforms, their manner and pace of implementation thus far has evoked fresh debates over their long-term sustainability and ensuing impact on the region’s rigid economic and social structures. This issue of the Oxford Energy Forum is devoted to exploring the overarching questions and assessing country-specific experience related to energy pricing reforms in the MENA. [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum – MENA Energy Pricing Reforms – Issue 108 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-forum-mena-energy-pricing-reforms-issue-108 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 10:23:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 09:23:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/?post_type=publications&p=30291 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [25] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30021 [post_author] => 111 [post_date] => 2017-01-16 13:31:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-16 13:31:43 [post_content] => It is well known that Russia is heavily dependent on its energy sector, from both an economic and a political perspective. As a result, the fall in the oil price over the past two years and the dramatic changes taking place in the global gas market are having significant consequences for both the Kremlin and Russia’s domestic energy companies. However, instead of reviewing the increased risks for Russia from the change in global energy markets, this edition of the Oxford Energy Forum discusses how Russia has started to adapt its policies and commercial strategies in a number of different areas. Some of the new strategies appear very positive, while others carry inherent risks, but all show how the world’s largest producer of hydrocarbons is being forced to respond politically and commercially to the shock of lower commodity prices. [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum – Russian energy issues in a volatile environment – Issue 107 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-forum-russian-energy-issues-volatile-environment-issue-107 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-16 13:32:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-16 13:32:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/?post_type=publications&p=30021 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [26] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29701 [post_author] => 111 [post_date] => 2016-10-07 09:51:40 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-10-07 08:51:40 [post_content] => Authors of the new OIES publication 'LNG Markets in Transition: The Great Reconfiguration',  share insights and conclusions from the book at a recent launch event hosted by CSIS in Washington, DC. [post_title] => LNG Markets in Transition: The Great Reconfiguration - launch event [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => lng-markets-transition-launch [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-10-07 09:55:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-10-07 08:55:23 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/?post_type=publications&p=29701 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [27] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29641 [post_author] => 111 [post_date] => 2016-09-19 13:13:02 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-09-19 12:13:02 [post_content] => The LNG market has seen dramatic shifts in its underlying fundamentals since the mid 2000s. The roller-coaster of pricing, the rise of LNG spot and short term trading and the emergence of the US as a source of ‘destination flexible’ supply are just some of the many dimensions of the industry which appear in a state of flux, not least due to the imminent arrival of new substantial supply from projects in Australia and the US. In September 2016 OIES and KAPSARC published ‘LNG Markets in Transition – The Great Reconfiguration’. This Issue of the Oxford Energy Forum comprises articles from several of the book chapter authors and the editor who provide summaries of their key findings. In summing up, Anne-Sophie Corbeau, the book’s editor, argues that the LNG world is undergoing a `great reconfiguration’, in terms of volume expansion and changes in commercial models including the dominance of long term contracts. She suggests that aside from partial extensions of existing contracts, as LNG markets move towards greater commoditisation, there will be no turning back to the traditional long term contract model. Whether new projects proceed without traditional long-term contracts will depend on lenders accepting that short term LNG trade will become the norm, with reliable spot price benchmarks and lower LNG costs supporting project economics. This should enhance the role of LNG in the development of flexible international gas trade, and hence make a major contribution to the increasing globalisation of the gas business. [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - LNG Markets: the great reconfiguration - Issue 106 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-forum-issue-106 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-09-19 13:13:02 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-09-19 12:13:02 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/?post_type=publications&p=29641 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [28] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29345 [post_author] => 111 [post_date] => 2016-06-28 11:24:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-06-28 10:24:34 [post_content] => This issue of Oxford Energy Forum (OEF) looks at the Paris Agreement (which came out of COP21 – the 21st Conference of Parties under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change) along with its implications for individual energy sources, for particular countries and regions, and for specific policy areas. Perhaps most striking is the range of views contained in the articles here and the disparity of impacts as between different sources, countries, and policy areas. Whereas in the last issue of OEF (where the focus was on electricity), there was much emphasis on the fundamental changes the industry is undergoing as a result of the rapid growth of low-carbon sources, and the similarity of the challenges in different parts of the world, the emphasis in this issue is on diversity. While some areas are seeing major changes and challenges, others are continuing with something little different from business-as-usual. The same applies to fuels; electricity is in the front line in most countries in relation to climate change policy, but for the oil and gas industries the challenges seem to be more to do with the medium- to longer-term. Perhaps as a result, investment markets seem distinctly uninterested in either the challenges or the opportunities offered by the low-carbon transition. Is this just realism or dangerous complacency about future developments? [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - Issue, 105 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-forum-issue-105 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-06-28 11:24:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-06-28 10:24:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/?post_type=publications&p=29345 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [29] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29237 [post_author] => 111 [post_date] => 2016-03-21 12:07:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-03-21 12:07:31 [post_content] => Transformation of the Electricity Sector: Technology, Policy and Business Models Electricity is in ferment – an unusual state for an industry which has traditionally been used to enjoying the stability of long term assets, steadily growing demand and secure revenues.  But these secure foundations are now coming into question as the industry faces major technological, economic and institutional change.  Perhaps most visible are the developments in electricity generation – the growing penetration of intermittent renewable generation, driven both by technological advances and by the policy commitment to decarbonisation.  Significant changes are also taking place elsewhere in the system, with the rapid development of information and control technology, which is opening the way for new approaches to system management and more flexible demand.  It is likely that we are only seeing the beginnings of these changes – they raise wider questions about the very nature of the industry’s product and its relationship with its customers. The technological developments have been accompanied by major policy and economic changes, notably: falling electricity demand, greater use of on-site generation leading to lower network income, governments rather than markets driving investment in both renewable and fossil generation.  However, the institutional frameworks surrounding the industry are struggling to keep up. For about two decades after 1990, governments across the world focused on liberalisation and the extension of market forces; now there is a new emphasis on decarbonisation, with governments rather than markets driving investment decisions.  The institutional frameworks surrounding the industry are struggling to keep up.  Governments have not yet worked out whether decarbonisation and liberalisation can go hand in hand or whether there is a fundamental conflict.  Markets have also been slow to adapt to the new era – the industry has traditionally relied on marginal cost (kWh) pricing, although a large proportion of its costs have always been fixed. With a growing penetration of zero marginal cost plants, the marginal cost approach looks increasingly outdated, whether at wholesale or retail level.  Regulation too needs to respond to the changes, including the increasing decentralisation of the system.  New control and coordination methods may be required to manage the rapid growth of intermittent generation, particularly wind.   Indeed the whole basis of the industry’s workings are coming into question: what ultimately are its products? How should it price them? What business models should the industry be developing? What are its resources and how do storage and demand response fit in? [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - Issue, 104 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-forum-issue-104 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-03-21 12:07:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-03-21 12:07:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/?post_type=publications&p=29237 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [30] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29069 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2015-12-16 13:49:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-12-16 13:49:36 [post_content] => Energy trading in Europe is on the verge of a fundamental transformation. The implementation of a host of new regulations: the European Market Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR),
the Markets in Financial Instruments Directive (MiFID), the Markets in Financial Instruments Regulation (MiFIR), the Market Abuse Regulation (MAR), the Capital Requirements Regulation (CRR), and the Capital Requirements Directive IV (CRD IV) 
will have profound implications for how international oil companies, trading houses, brokerage firms, investment banks, price-reporting agencies,
and futures exchanges do business. While there is a consensus among the contributors to this Forum that the new regulations will change the landscape by increasing the complexity of the trading business and the cost of compliance, as well as increasing reporting and capital requirements, there remains much uncertainty as
to whether these new regulations will achieve their intended objectives. Of particular concern are the unintended consequences of some of these regulations in terms of: reducing market liquidity, reducing the number of market players, the risks of regulatory arbitrage, and increasing the cost of hedging. [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - Special Issue, 103 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-forum-special-issue-103 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-26 14:20:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-26 14:20:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/?post_type=publications&p=29069 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [31] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29049 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2015-11-23 13:30:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-11-23 13:30:36 [post_content] => While the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) continues to play a pivotal role as the world’s supplier of oil and, to a lesser extent gas, the collapse in global oil prices since mid-2014 has refocused the debate on the region’s ability to use oil revenues to build sustainable and diversified economies that can one day function without oil, or at least reduce their heavy dependence on the export of only a single commodity. The Paris Climate Conference in December 2015 will provide an opportunity to the global community, including MENA countries, to contribute new vision and perspectives to the debate, and to engage proactively in leading regional green policy efforts. In this issue of the Oxford Energy Forum, we ask the question directly: can the MENA economies use this time to initiate the switch from fossil fuels to renewables, from wasteful energy consumption towards energy efficiency? Can the region re-invent itself? Can it ‘grow green’? [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - Issue, 102 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-forum-issue-102 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-03-16 11:55:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-03-16 11:55:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/?post_type=publications&p=29049 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [32] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27321 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2015-09-28 10:02:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-09-28 09:02:07 [post_content] => This issue of the Oxford Energy Forum is dedicated to gas pricing. A mild 2013/14 winter in Europe and parts of Asia and a slowing of demand growth for LNG saw European hub prices and LNG spot prices begin to fall through the summer of 2014. The collapse of the oil price in late 2014 resulted in a lagged reduction in long-term contract prices (LNG and pipeline gas) to levels below $10/MMBtu in Europe and Asia. These events followed a period from 2011 to 2013 in which regional gas reference prices in the USA, Europe, and Asia appeared to be held within stable 'corridors' at levels which incentivized the progression of a long list of new LNG projects in North America, East Africa, Australia, and Russia. Many of these will likely be 'on hold' pending indications of a more supportive future price environment, but some 150 bcm/year of new LNG supply from the USA and Australia will have achieved start-up by 2020; this will add further pressure on prices and stimulate inter-regional arbitrage. [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - Issue, 101 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-forum-issue-101 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-09-28 10:02:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-09-28 09:02:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/oxford-energy-forum-issue-101/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [33] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27334 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2015-07-09 11:20:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-07-09 10:20:21 [post_content] => In collaboration with OIES and KAPSARC, Clingendael International Energy Programme (CIEP) hosted a workshop in March 2015 to discuss the structural changes shaping the crude oil and petroleum products markets and the shifts in trade flows. The general view was that apart from the structural changes in crude oil supply and demand, oil product markets are also rapidly changing, creating even more complex import and export relationships among countries. As refined product exports increasingly displace crude exports among some of the major producers, producers and end-consumers will be bound by more varied chains of trade in refined products. [post_title] => Crude Oil Markets in 2015 - the battle for market share [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => crude-oil-markets-in-2015-the-battle-for-market-share [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-29 16:19:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-29 16:19:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/crude-oil-markets-in-2015-the-battle-for-market-share/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [34] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27338 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2015-06-08 10:14:28 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-06-08 09:14:28 [post_content] => This special issue of the Forum is dedicated to Robert Mabro who founded the Oxford Energy Policy Club in 1976, the Oxford Energy Seminar in 1979, and the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies in 1982. In this issue of the Oxford Energy Forum, Robert’s colleagues and friends reflect on the man and his work and how his extraordinary contribution to the field has enriched our understanding of energy markets, the behaviour of the various players, the dynamics within OPEC, the consumer-producer dialogue, and the interaction between governments and oil companies and how his deep insights and intellectually integrity continue to shape and influence thinking. [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - Issue, 100 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-forum-issue-100 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-08-04 14:01:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-08-04 13:01:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/oxford-energy-forum-issue-100/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [35] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27357 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2015-03-26 15:18:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-03-26 15:18:30 [post_content] => Released today by the Center on Global Energy Policy The US Shale Gas Revolution and its Impact on Qatar's Position in Gas Markets is a collaborative study between CGEP, Columbia and the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies that examines how Qatar may be impacted by major changes to the global LNG market. The expansion of Qatar's LNG industry in the latter half of the 2010s, unprecedented in its scale and pace, established the country as the world’s largest LNG supplier. Such a move was made possible due to a sound business strategy of diversified sales and the disciplined execution of multiple projects. In addition to supporting its LNG business, Qatar's offshore North Field also underpinned the rapid growth of a domestic industrial sector and limited regional pipeline exports. LNG is a dynamic sector however and Qatar has many new challenges to address, including the rise of competing new supplies from Australia, the US, East Africa, Canada and Russia, uncertainty about the pace of Asian LNG demand and a desire on the part of LNG importers to move away from oil-indexation as the price formation mechanism for long term LNG contracts. With its moratorium on new LNG projects expected to remain in place for the medium term at least, Qatar will seek to adapt its sales portfolio strategy in order to optimise its revenues in a more competitive market. This said, Qatar has a number of comparative advantages. Its geographic location enables it to access Asian and European markets without undue transport cost penalties, co-production of condensate and NGLs from the North field adds significant robustness to the economics of existing and future new projects and its remaining undeveloped reserves available for LNG notably exceed those of its competitors. In addition Qatar’s proven track record on project implementation and its low cost location would also allow it to deter competition, should it announce an intention to resume an expansion of capacity. Although the recent falls in oil and regional gas prices will impact Qatar's hydrocarbon revenues, the country has the financial resilience to weather these storms and to remain a powerful force in the LNG business for the foreseeable future. Full Report [post_title] => The US Shale Gas Revolution and its Impact on Qatar's Position in Gas Markets [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-us-shale-gas-revolution-and-its-impact-on-qatars-position-in-gas-markets [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-29 16:06:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-29 16:06:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/the-us-shale-gas-revolution-and-its-impact-on-qatars-position-in-gas-markets/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [36] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27362 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2015-03-09 14:55:46 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-03-09 14:55:46 [post_content] => This issue of the Oxford Energy Forum is dedicated to Energy in India. Set against the landscape of an uncertain international energy market and a potential slowing of China’s economic growth, the Indian economy stands poised as a hopeful prospect (the IMF forecasts growth of 6.3 per cent in 2015) in an otherwise unsteady global economic recovery. However, India’s new government, elected last May, faces significant challenges in implementing energy reforms, given the complex intertwining of physical (supply), fiscal, poverty and environmental issues. This issue draws together key debates on Indian energy. [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - Issue, 99 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-forum-issue-99 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-09 14:55:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-09 14:55:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/oxford-energy-forum-issue-99/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [37] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27375 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2015-01-23 12:02:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-01-23 12:02:53 [post_content] =>

Oxford Institute for Energy Studies has, for the second year running, been named the top Energy and Resource Think Tank in the world by the University of Pennsylvania's annual think tank report.

The Global Go To Think Tank Index is designed to identify and recognise centres of excellence in all major areas of public policy research in every region of the world.

To achieve the number one ranking in our field is a testament to the work of our Research Fellows, the multidisciplinary nature of our research, our academic excellence and intellectual independence. We will continue to conduct research that leads to a more informed and balanced understanding of the behaviour, motivations and objectives of the various economic forces, agents and policy makers that operate in or influence the performance of international energy markets.

Top Energy and Resource Policy Think Tanks
Table 17

1. Oxford Institute for Energy Studies (OIES) (United Kingdom)
2. World Resource Institute (WRI) (United States)
3. Institute of Energy Economics (IEEJ) (Japan)
4. James A Baker III Institute for Public Policy (United States)
5. RAND Corporation (United States)
6. Center for Science of Environment, Resources, and Energy (Japan)
7. TERI: The Energy and Resources Institute (India)
8. Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR) (United States)
9. Resoucres for the Future (RFF) (United States)
10. Energy Studies Institute (ESI) (Singapore)

 

To view the full report please click on the link: http://repository.upenn.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1008&context=think_tanks

[post_title] => OIES No. 1 Energy and Resource Think Tank 2014 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oies-no-1-energy-and-resource-think-tank-2014 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-01-23 12:02:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-01-23 12:02:53 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/oies-no-1-energy-and-resource-think-tank-2014/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [38] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27381 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2015-01-12 11:32:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-01-12 11:32:31 [post_content] => Latin America is once again on the radar of the international and regional oil and gas industry, service companies, and policy makers. Secular changes in the petroleum investment risk profile of major oil and gas hubs such as Russia, North Africa, West Africa, and the Middle East, limited access to acreage in the traditional producing areas, as well as the lack of new exploration successes outside the emerging provinces such as East Africa and the Eastern Mediterranean, among others, have made Latin America an interesting place to re-visit. These circumstances have coincided with the North American unconventional boom and Mexico’s landmark reform that brought the Americas back onto the industry map again. This issue of the Forum covers several regional themes that will shed some light on the challenges and opportunities for the region, as well as some specific country themes. [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - Issue, 98 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-forum-issue-98 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-01-12 11:32:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-01-12 11:32:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/oxford-energy-forum-issue-98/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [39] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27399 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2014-09-22 12:19:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-09-22 11:19:20 [post_content] => Energy in Russia, the subject of this issue of the Oxford Energy Forum, has this year returned to the forefront of debates among academics, policy makers, and those in the industry. Politics, never far from these debates, is a factor: as a result of events in Ukraine, the tension between Russia and the western powers has risen to its highest level since the Cold War. The editors have endeavoured to provide commentary on the political and economic context of energy developments, while also inviting recognized specialists to comment on the host of issues - from long-term upstream oil issues to Russia's domestic electricity market - that are sometimes neglected by the big-picture analysts. [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - Issue, 97 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-forum-issue-97 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-09-22 12:19:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-09-22 11:19:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/oxford-energy-forum-issue-97/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [40] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27415 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2014-06-16 10:20:56 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-06-16 09:20:56 [post_content] => Oil has defined the modern-day development of the Gulf region in a
way seen in no other place in the world; together, the six members of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates, are home to around a third of known global reserves of oil, and nearly a quarter of its natural gas. Saudi Arabia remains the world’s most important producer
 of conventional oil, and continues to hold the majority of the world’s spare capacity, while Qatar has become the world’s largest producer of liquefied natural gas. This reflects the GCC states’ continuing pivotal role on global energy markets as a key centre of world energy supply. The fast-track economic growth and development experienced by the GCC economies since the mid-20th century in particular, however, has also left its toll on the region’s energy profile. No longer just global suppliers of energy, the GCC states have become a key centre of energy demand growth in their own right, accounting to a large extent for projections such as those by the IEA that see the Middle East alongside Asia as the world’s future energy demand growth centres well into the 2030s. This issue of OEF reflects on the variety of options and challenges faced by the GCC states more than a decade into the new millennium, and offers perspectives on future policy choices inside one of the world’s most important group of energy producers. [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - Issue, 96 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-forum-issue-96 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-06-16 10:20:56 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-06-16 09:20:56 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/oxford-energy-forum-issue-96/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [41] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27420 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2014-04-14 15:00:48 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-04-14 14:00:48 [post_content] => This issue of the Forum is dedicated to developments in Chinese energy [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - Issue, 95 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-forum-issue-95 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-04-14 15:00:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-04-14 14:00:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/oxford-energy-forum-issue-95/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [42] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27446 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2014-01-14 12:04:40 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-01-14 12:04:40 [post_content] => Oil Benchmarks [post_title] => Oxford Energy Forum - Issue, 94 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oxford-energy-forum-issue-94 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-01-14 12:04:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-01-14 12:04:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/oxford-energy-forum-issue-94/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [43] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27462 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-10-10 15:12:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-10-10 14:12:31 [post_content] => East Mediterranean Gas - opportunities and challenges [post_title] => Issue 93, August 2013 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-93-august-2013 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-10-10 15:12:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-10-10 14:12:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-93-august-2013/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [44] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27469 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-07-29 14:14:02 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-07-29 13:14:02 [post_content] => The Changing Refining Sector [post_title] => Issue 92, May 2013 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-92-may-2013 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-07-29 14:14:02 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-07-29 13:14:02 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-92-may-2013/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [45] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27486 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-05-03 12:58:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-05-03 11:58:31 [post_content] => Developments in US Energy [post_title] => Issue 91, February 2013 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-91-february-2013 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-05-03 12:58:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-05-03 11:58:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-91-february-2013/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [46] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27500 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2013-01-14 11:44:12 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-01-14 11:44:12 [post_content] => Africa's Energy Outlook [post_title] => OEF, Issue 90, November 2012 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oef-issue-90-november-2012 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-01-14 11:44:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-01-14 11:44:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/oef-issue-90-november-2012/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [47] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27513 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2012-10-17 12:18:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-10-17 11:18:39 [post_content] => Natural Gas Demand and Supply [post_title] => Issue 89, August 2012 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-89-august-2012 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-10-17 12:18:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2012-10-17 11:18:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-89-august-2012/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [48] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28119 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2012-10-17 12:18:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-10-17 11:18:39 [post_content] => Natural Gas Demand and Supply [post_title] => Issue 89, August 2012 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-89-august-2012-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-10-17 12:18:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2012-10-17 11:18:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-89-august-2012-2/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [49] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28150 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2012-06-12 14:50:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-06-12 13:50:38 [post_content] => The Controvery over Energy Subsidies [post_title] => Issue 88, May 2012 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-88-may-2012-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-06-12 14:50:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2012-06-12 13:50:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-88-may-2012-2/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [50] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28182 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2012-03-27 15:36:44 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-03-27 14:36:44 [post_content] => Oil Price Benchmarks in International Trade by Jorge Montepeque, Liz Bossley, Christophe Barret, Peter Stewart, Mike Davis, Bassam Fattouh, Amrita Sen, Peter Caddy, Giacomo Luciani, Salvatore Carollo [post_title] => Issue 87, February 2012 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-87-february-2012-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-03-27 15:36:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2012-03-27 14:36:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-87-february-2012-2/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [51] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27550 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2012-01-31 11:14:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-01-31 11:14:25 [post_content] => Technological Challenges and Developments by Ivan Sandrea, David Bamford, Petrobras and Boston Consulting Group, Michelle Michot Foss, Trisha Curtis, Samer Ashgar, Robert G. Skinner, Franz B. Ehrhardt, Tara Shirvani and Oliver R. Inderwildi. [post_title] => Issue 86, November 2011 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-86-november-2011 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-01-31 11:14:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2012-01-31 11:14:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-86-november-2011/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [52] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28202 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2011-12-07 12:20:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-12-07 12:20:31 [post_content] => Several members of OIES contributed articles to, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Volume 27, Issue 1, Spring 2011, edited by Christopher Allsopp and Bassam Fattouh. Each issue concentrates on a current theme in economic policy, with a balance between macro- and microeconomics, giving a valuable appraisal of economic policies worldwide. Volume 27, Issue 1, focuses on Oil and International Energy Markets. To access the articles please click on the links below: Oil and international energy, Christopher Allsopp and Bassam Fattouh Oil price shocks and the macroeconomy, Paul Segal Uncertainty, expectations, and fundamentals: whatever happened to long-term oil prices? Bassam Fattouh and Pasquale Scaramozzino Shale gas-the unfolding story, Howard Rogers [post_title] => Oil and International Energy Markets [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oil-and-international-energy-markets-3 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-12-07 12:20:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2011-12-07 12:20:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/oil-and-international-energy-markets-3/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [53] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28203 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2011-12-07 12:08:56 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-12-07 12:08:56 [post_content] => Several members of OIES contributed articles to, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Volume 27, Issue 1, Spring 2011, edited by Christopher Allsopp and Bassam Fattouh. Each issue concentrates on a current theme in economic policy, with a balance between macro- and microeconomics, giving a valuable appraisal of economic policies worldwide. Volume 27, Issue 1, focuses on Oil and International Energy Markets. To access the articles please click on the links below:     [post_title] => Oil and International Energy Markets [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => oil-and-international-energy-markets-4 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-26 16:35:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-26 16:35:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/oil-and-international-energy-markets-4/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [54] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28207 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2011-10-04 11:40:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-10-04 10:40:55 [post_content] => Nuclear Energy post Fuklushima Malcolm Grimston Gordon Mackerron Malcolm Keay Interconnecting the GCC States Laura El-Katiri Oil and Gas Resources Bassam Fattouh James Henderson Juan Carlos Boue [post_title] => Issue 85, August 2011 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-85-august-2011-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-10-04 11:40:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2011-10-04 10:40:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-85-august-2011-2/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [55] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27583 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2011-05-18 10:46:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-05-18 09:46:57 [post_content] => Political Events in the Middle East and their Impact on Energy Robert Mabro, Helima L. Croft and Amrita Sen.Hakim Darbouche. John Hamilton and Emma Murphy WTI and Brent Benchmarks Edward L. Morse, Bob Levin Twenty Years of Producer–Consumer Dialogue Bassam Fattouh and Coby van der Linde [post_title] => Issue 84, May 2011 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-84-may-2011 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-05-18 10:46:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2011-05-18 09:46:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-84-may-2011/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [56] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28248 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2010-08-31 13:48:46 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-08-31 12:48:46 [post_content] => The Uproar Surrounding Petroleum Contract Renegotiations George Kahale, III   An Anatomy of the Oil Pricing Regime Bassam Fattouh   The Balance between Long- and Short-term LNG Suppliesin the European Gas Industry Axel M Wietfeld   Gas-to-power in North Africa: Implications for gas exports and supply Hakim Darbouche [post_title] => Issue 82, August 2010 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-82-august-2010-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2010-08-31 13:48:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2010-08-31 12:48:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-82-august-2010-2/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [57] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28253 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2010-05-17 10:25:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-05-17 09:25:11 [post_content] => Energy Poverty Robert Bacon, Suleiman J. Al-Herbish The Credit Crunch and International Energy Markets Christopher Allsopp Gas Matters Stephen Bell, Armelle Lecarpentier Reforming UK Electricity Markets John Rhys [post_title] => Issue 81 May 2010 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-81-may-2010-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2010-05-17 10:25:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2010-05-17 09:25:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-81-may-2010-2/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [58] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28263 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2010-02-17 10:23:06 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-02-17 10:23:06 [post_content] => Copenhagen: A Partial or a Significant Success? Benito Müller, Marianne Haug Global Oil Demand Dynamics: Rebalancing the Debate Bassam Fattouh On Oil Peak or Peaks? Robert Mabro Oil Price and the Animal Spirits: Implications for the Oil Industry Leadership Edgar Jones Does the Electric Car have a Future? David Robinson, François Badin [post_title] => Issue 80 February 2010 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-80-february-2010-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2010-02-17 10:23:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2010-02-17 10:23:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-80-february-2010-2/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [59] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27629 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2009-11-17 10:21:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-11-17 10:21:04 [post_content] => Oil Price Volatility Bassam Fattouh and Paul Segal, Robert Mabro Problems of Oil Production Lars Erik Aamot, Shamil Midkhatovich Yenikeyeff European Natural Gas Prices Howard Rogers Solar Energy Malcolm Keay, Till Stenzel [post_title] => Issue 79 November 2009 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-79-november-2009 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2009-11-17 10:21:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2009-11-17 10:21:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-79-november-2009/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [60] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27639 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2009-08-17 10:19:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-08-17 09:19:15 [post_content] => Obama’s Energy Policy Joseph A. Stanislaw, Richard Matzke, David Robinson How Resource Revenues can Halve Global Poverty Paul Segal Will a Crude Oil Price Band Stabilise the Market? Bassam Fattouh Wind Power John Constable and Hideaki Aoyama, Malcolm Keay [post_title] => Issue 78 August 2009 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-78-august-2009 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2009-08-17 10:19:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2009-08-17 09:19:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-78-august-2009/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [61] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28289 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2009-05-17 10:17:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-05-17 09:17:00 [post_content] => The Effects of Low Prices on Oil and Gas Investments Edward L. Morse, Pedro Haas and Greg Terzian, Ali Aissaoui The Oil Price Crisis of 1998-9 and 2008-9 Robert Mabro Energy RD&D: a much needed clean tech stimulus Marianne Haug Venezuelan Oil Production Data Juan Carlos Boué [post_title] => Issue 77 May 2009 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-77-may-2009-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2009-05-17 10:17:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2009-05-17 09:17:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-77-may-2009-2/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [62] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27653 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2009-02-17 10:15:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-02-17 10:15:33 [post_content] => European Union Energy Policy David Buchan, Giacomo Luciani Features of Recent Oil Developments Paul Horsnell and Costanza Jacazio, Ivan Sandrea, Bassam Fattouh LNG Trading: Overview and Challenges Alex Wietfeld and Niels Fenzl [post_title] => Issue 76 February 2009 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-76-february-2009 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2009-02-17 10:15:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2009-02-17 10:15:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-76-february-2009/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [63] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27664 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2008-11-17 10:14:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2008-11-17 10:14:22 [post_content] => Middle East Political Stability Henry Siegman, Lkhdar Brahimi, Eric Rouleau, Walid Khadduri Wither OPEC? Robert Mabro, Bassam Fattouh Personal Commentary Andrew Gould [post_title] => Issue 75 November 2008 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-75-november-2008 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2008-11-17 10:14:22 [post_modified_gmt] => 2008-11-17 10:14:22 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-75-november-2008/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [64] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27670 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2008-09-17 10:11:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2008-09-17 09:11:54 [post_content] => Limits and Possibilities of US Energy Policy Malcolm Keay, Jerome E. Roos, Jim Arrowsmith The Oil Price Conundrum Robert E. Mabro The Oil-Climate Bargain Peter Fox-Penner and Matthew McCaffree Personal Comment Mark Moody-Stuart [post_title] => Issue 74 September 2008 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-74-september-2008 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2008-09-17 10:11:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2008-09-17 09:11:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-74-september-2008/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [65] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28318 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2008-05-17 10:09:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2008-05-17 09:09:43 [post_content] => Oil in Africa Jean-Pierre Favennec, Bassam Fattouh, Walid Khadduri, Philippe Copinschi, Gerald Doucet and Latsoucabé Fall US Presidential Candidates and Energy Michael Lynch Comments on Gas Demand, Contrasts and Prices James T. Jensen [post_title] => Issue 73 May 2008 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-73-may-2008-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2008-05-17 10:09:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2008-05-17 09:09:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-73-may-2008-2/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [66] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27688 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2008-02-17 09:58:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2008-02-17 09:58:26 [post_content] => Gas and Transitional Fuel Jonathan Stern, Michael Stoppard, Burckhard Bergmann, Thierry Bros, Simon Pirani Assessments of Bali 2007 Benito Mueller, David Robinson Personal Commentary Nader Sultan [post_title] => Issue 72 February 2008 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-72-february-2008 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2008-02-17 09:58:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2008-02-17 09:58:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-72-february-2008/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [67] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27694 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2007-11-17 09:55:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2007-11-17 09:55:36 [post_content] => Security of Supply Paul Isbell, John Gault, William C. Ramsay, Hasan M. Qabazard The Dynamics of Oil and Price Determination Paul Horsnell Letter and Comment Paul Newman, Robert Dudley Environment and Climate Change Simon Caney, Benito Mueller, Robert Ritz, Paul Newman, Liz Bossley [post_title] => Issue 71 November 2007 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-71-november-2007 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2007-11-17 09:55:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2007-11-17 09:55:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-71-november-2007/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [68] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27700 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2007-09-17 09:53:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2007-09-17 08:53:39 [post_content] => Access to Oil Reserves Robert Mabro, Nordine Ait Laoussine, Michael Daly, Patrick Poyanne Angola's Entry in OPEC: a win-win move? Sadek Boussena The Battle of the Sour Futures Contracts Bassam Fattouh Venezuelan Oil - The Unfulfilled Promise Luis A. Pacheco [post_title] => Issue 70 September 2007 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-70-september-2007 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2007-09-17 09:53:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2007-09-17 08:53:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-70-september-2007/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [69] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27709 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2007-05-17 09:48:44 [post_date_gmt] => 2007-05-17 08:48:44 [post_content] => Oil and Gas Developments in some American Countries Adrian Lajous, Rogerio Manso, Ivan Sandrea, Anouk Honoré China in Africa Lindsey Hilsum, Bassam Fattouh [post_title] => Issue 69 May 2007 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-69-may-2007 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2007-05-17 09:48:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2007-05-17 08:48:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-69-may-2007/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [70] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27760 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2007-02-17 09:45:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2007-02-17 09:45:18 [post_content] => Nuclear Energy Alain Bucaille, Adnan Shihab-Eldin, Pierre-René Bauquis Climate Change, a Global Problem, is a Global Solution Possible? Peter Nichols The Oil Price Regime, Bassam Fattouh, Robert Mabro The Re-emergence of Ethanol Fuel in Brazil Eduardo Luiz Correia [post_title] => Issue 68 February 2007 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-68-february-2007 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2007-02-17 09:45:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2007-02-17 09:45:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-68-february-2007/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [71] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27773 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2006-11-17 09:38:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2006-11-17 09:38:07 [post_content] => Energy Policy John Mitchell, Terra Allas, Peter Odell, Olivier Appert Energy in Flux Joseph Stanislaw US Environment Policy in states vs. the States David Fridley, Benito Müller Personal Commentary Adrian Lajous [post_title] => Issue 67 November 2006 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-67-november-2006 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2006-11-17 09:38:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2006-11-17 09:38:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-67-november-2006/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [72] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27788 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2006-08-17 09:35:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2006-08-17 08:35:21 [post_content] => Is Russia a Threat to Energy Supplies? Jonathan Stern, Giacomo Luciani, Shamil Midkhatovich Yenikeyeff The UK Energy Review and Nuclear Power Charles Henderson The Geopolitical Causes of High Oil Prices Walid Khadduri, Eric Rouleau, Philippe Copinschi, Anouk Honoré Why is the Macroeconomic Impact of Oil Prices Different this Time? Christopher Allsopp [post_title] => Issue 66 August 2006 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-66-august-2006 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2006-08-17 09:35:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2006-08-17 08:35:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-66-august-2006/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [73] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27799 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2006-06-17 09:29:51 [post_date_gmt] => 2006-06-17 08:29:51 [post_content] => The International Oil Companies Richard Gordon, Chriss Ross and Lane Sloan, Ged Davis Gas Prices in the uk : Markets and Insecurity of Supply Philip Wright The Engineering Procurement Construction Industry Malcolm Harrison The Gas Exporting Countries Forum and Europe Hadi Hallouche Some Farewell Comments Ian Skeet Personal Commentary Derek Riley [post_title] => Issue 65 June 2006 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-65-june-2006 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2006-06-17 09:29:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2006-06-17 08:29:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-65-june-2006/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [74] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27824 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2006-02-17 09:26:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2006-02-17 09:26:15 [post_content] => Economic Implications of the Oil Price Increase Roger Van Noorden, Hassan Hakimian, Walid Khadduri Environmental Issues Malcolm Keay and Benito Muller The Role of Technology in reducing E&P Costs Mark Andersen The Strategies of non-OECD Gas Producers Hadi Hallouche, Michael Tamvakis, Bryan Train Personal Commentary Charles Henderson [post_title] => Issue 64 February 2006 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-64-february-2006 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2006-02-17 09:26:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2006-02-17 09:26:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-64-february-2006/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [75] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27832 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2005-11-17 09:07:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2005-11-17 09:07:04 [post_content] => Upstream Taxation Alex Kemp, Pedro Van Meurs, Robert Arnott US Energy Policy Act of 2005 Shirley Neff and Amy Meyers Jaffe The Future of Russian Gas and Gazprom Jonathan Stern Too Many ‘Perfect Storms' Robert Skinner Personal Commentary John Mitchell [post_title] => Issue 63 November 2005 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-63-november-2005 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2005-11-17 09:07:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2005-11-17 09:07:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-63-november-2005/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [76] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27839 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2005-08-17 09:04:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2005-08-17 08:04:16 [post_content] => Refining and Price Franz Ehrhardt, Douglas Terreson, Marshall Hall Impact of the Power Generation Sector on Future European Gas Demand Anouk Honore Oil Prices and Fundamentals Katherine Spector, David Long, Paul Horsnell [You can download the Paul Horsnell article here] Personal Commentary Julian West [post_title] => Issue 62 August 2005 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-62-august-2005 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2005-08-17 09:04:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2005-08-17 08:04:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-62-august-2005/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [77] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27848 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2005-05-17 09:01:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2005-05-17 08:01:33 [post_content] => Nuclear Energy David Waller and Alan McDonald, Judith Greenwald, Paul Mobbs Indian Gas Supply: Elixir for Growth or Priced out of Reach Chris Hansen Oil Production Expectations outside the Middle East Andrew Hayman and Ivan Sandrea Personal Commentary Whalid Khadduri [post_title] => Issue 61 May 2005 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-61-may-2005 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2005-05-17 09:01:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2005-05-17 08:01:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-61-may-2005/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [78] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27857 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2005-02-17 08:59:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2005-02-17 08:59:50 [post_content] => Energy Policy: Old Baggage John Mitchell Technology and Energy – 21st Century Outlook Bernard J. Bulkin OPEC and the 21st Century. What has Changed and what have we Learnt? Pedro Antonio Merino Garcia The Private Oil Companies: From Consolidation to Growth Robert Arnott What Role Derivatives? Paul Newman Multilateral Energy Co-operation in Northeast Asia : Promise or Mirage? Philip Andrews-Speed, Xuanli Liao and Paul Stevens Lessons from North America Edward Morse [post_title] => Issue 60 February 2005 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-60-february-2005 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-29 14:04:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-29 14:04:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-60-february-2005/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [79] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27862 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2004-11-17 08:51:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2004-11-17 08:51:22 [post_content] => Investment in LNG David Ledesma, Ben Smith, Julia Richardson & John Burnes Jr Investment in Power Generation Lindsay Tuthill John Bower Mark Lijesen and Gijsbert Zwart Personal Commentary Philip J. Carroll [post_title] => Issue 59 November 2004 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-59-november-2004 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-29 14:04:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-29 14:04:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-59-november-2004/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [80] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27883 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2004-08-16 17:40:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2004-08-16 16:40:30 [post_content] => Why Oil Prices Have Moved Higher Paul Horsnell Gas to Liquids Howard Bevan, Johann Van Rheede, Bipin Patel Why Oil Prices Have Moved Higher Paul Horsnell The Value of Oil and Gas Reserves - SEC Definitions Peter Nicol, Brian Rhodes and Andy Crouch Personal Commentary Peter Odell [post_title] => Issue 58 August 2004 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => issue-58-august-2004 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-29 14:02:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-29 14:02:53 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/issue-58-august-2004/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [81] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27915 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2004-02-01 00:00:58 [post_date_gmt] => 2004-02-01 00:00:58 [post_content] => U.S. and EU federal authorities have wrongly concluded that lack of investment is causing transmission congestion and threatening system security in liberalised electricity markets. This perception has unfortunately been reinforced by the blackouts of summer 2003. [post_title] => Blackouts: Invest, Intervene or Inveigh? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => blackouts-invest-intervene-or-inveigh [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2004-02-01 00:00:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2004-02-01 00:00:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/blackouts-invest-intervene-or-inveigh/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [82] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27946 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2003-03-01 00:00:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2003-03-01 00:00:34 [post_content] => The aim of this study is to investigate the future risks to supply for the global markets for oil, coal and uranium. The study forms part of an integrated project by the CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis, which is developing a framework for a cost benefit analysis of energy supply security policy. [post_title] => Exploration of Future Risks on the Global Markets for Oil, Coal and Uranium [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => exploration-of-future-risks-on-the-global-markets-for-oil-coal-and-uranium [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-29 13:58:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-29 13:58:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/exploration-of-future-risks-on-the-global-markets-for-oil-coal-and-uranium/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [83] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28159 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 1986-01-01 00:00:37 [post_date_gmt] => 1986-01-01 00:00:37 [post_content] => The recent history of the informal market f o r North Sea Brent blend has been of great interest to those studying commodity markets in general and the oil market in particular .  Two aspects of this market gives it this important position.  First, the very rapid growth inactivity in the Brent market means that for much of 1985 an average of at least 400 deals a month were being made. With each deal being for a lot size of 600,000 barrels of oil at around $25 a barrel the total turnover i n 1985 was at least $72 billion . The second feature of the market is that it operates as an informal forward market. There is no central clearing agency, as in a futures market, and so each deal is done directly between agents. [post_title] => The Brent Market: An Analysis of Recent Developments [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-brent-market-an-analysis-of-recent-developments [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-29 13:43:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-29 13:43:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/the-brent-market-an-analysis-of-recent-developments/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 84 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 31265 [post_author] => 111 [post_date] => 2018-11-13 11:28:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-11-13 11:28:16 [post_content] => In this latest Oxford Energy podcast James Henderson and Vitaly Yermakov discuss Vitaly’s forthcoming paper on Russia’s gas supply surplus. It has been widely documented that Gazprom has had 100bcm or more spare gas for potential export to Europe, but recent increases in production have reduced this figure. In addition, Vitaly outlines his concern that, although the surplus is available on an annual basis, Gazprom may have much less room for manoeuvre on a seasonal basis, especially on very cold days in winter. 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