Hasan Muslemani

OIES-KAPSARC Senior Research Fellow & Head of Carbon Management Research

Hasan has a multinational background and a career spanning multiple disciplines, including carbon markets, natural sciences and climate and energy policy. He holds a PhD in Carbon Finance from the University of Edinburgh Business School, where his research focused on designing business models for breakthrough low-carbon technologies in steelmaking, in particular carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technology, to bring ‘green steel’ products to the market. He also holds an MSc in Carbon Finance and an MSc in Oceanography, on the back of a BSc in Biology with focus on marine sciences.

At OIES, Hasan leads the Carbon Management research module within the Energy Transition Research Initiative (ETRI), where the module appraises business cases and the potential for CCUS in the power and industrial sectors (e.g. cement, steel and energy-from-waste) and explores topics and case studies relevant to the most promising carbon removal and negative emission technologies including tech-based ones (e.g. Direct Air Capture) and nature-based solutions.

Hasan had previously taken up several roles in climate and energy consultancy and academic and industry research. In academia, He served as a lecturer and module lead at University College London (UCL) and the University of Edinburgh, delivering postgraduate courses on energy finance and policy, and energy and environmental markets. He has also taken up EU-funded research fellowships at ESADE Business School in Barcelona and at Edinburgh. He has played a key part in securing a number of partnership grants with international institutions focused on CCUS research, including BHP Billiton, the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO), Peking University and Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China, and the University of Waterloo, Canada. Hasan also served as a consultant to overseas governments and organisations, particularly in China and Southeast Asia, including delivering reports on the financial viability of CCUS to the World Bank and Asian Development Bank. Most recently, he served as a carbon removals scientist at BeZero Carbon, focusing on developing and implementing a carbon credits rating framework to provide transparency over the quality of carbon offsets in the voluntary carbon market.

Along his OIES publications, Hasan has published a number of journal articles on CCS and green steel, and is a member of various associations including the British Institute of Energy Economics (BIEE), the International Association for Energy Economics (IAEE), and the European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists (EARE).

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                    [post_content] => If two different jurisdictions are involved in the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) chain, CO2 handling needs to be harmonized across borders and interface issues should be resolved (e.g. technical and operational standards, certification, transfer of ownership and risk, etc.). Similar to the imbalance which exists between the demand for fossil fuels between importing and exporting countries, suitable geological formations for CO2 storage may not exist in the highest-emitting countries, which calls for a need to export CO2 to countries with more suitable storage sites. It may also be in the interest of fossil fuel exporting countries to help their customers to dispose of CO2 stemming from imported hydrocarbons, as importing countries may have no other option due to the lack of sequestration potential (e.g. Japan). This will involve exporting and importing of CO2 across borders, relying on offshore transport by ships or via pipelines in most cases. Thus far, such examples include the transport of CO2 by onshore pipelines from the Boundary Dam project in Canada to the Weyburn project in the US, and the upcoming Longship project which envisages cross-border transport of CO2 via shipping from the UK and EU countries to Norway. All other projects so far have been within one jurisdiction. However, most recently (August 2022), Northern Lights signed a first-of-its-kind commercial agreement for cross-border CO2 capture and transport, where, from 2025, CO2 will be captured, compressed and liquified in the Netherlands, to be transported and stored in Norway. It is expected that other similar ventures will be established, making the publication of this study all the more timely.

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                    [post_content] => This paper aims to examine consumer behaviour towards, and the willingness to adopt, ‘green steel’ in the automotive sector. Semi-structured interviews were held with experts from global, regional and country-specific industry associations and automakers. This paper appraises potential demand for green steel within different vehicle types (based both on size and powertrain) and shows that manufacturers of electric heavy-duty vehicles are most likely to be the first adopters of green steel. A case for green advanced higher-strength steels (AHSS) can also be made in light-duty passenger vehicles, which may mitigate competition from alternative lightweight materials in terms of cost and greenness (depending on source and utilization regions). This work emphasizes a need to revisit current CO2 performance regulations, engage in educational green marketing campaigns, and explore innovative market-based mechanisms to bridge the gap between relatively-low carbon abatement costs of steelmaking and high abatement costs of vehicle manufacturing.
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Latest Publications by Hasan Muslemani