Rob West

Research Associate

Rob West is the Founder of Thunder Said Energy, a new research consultancy into disruptive energy technologies. His main interests are the ascent of shale, renewables, smaller-scale gas and digital oilfield technologies, to attract capital into the energy industry.

Previously, Rob was the Head of Global Energy Research at Redburn, where he advised institutional investors on the “Super Majors”; and part of Sanford Bernstein’s European Oil & Gas team. He has completed 75 modules from the IPIMS Petroleum Geology & Engineering programme, which is used by 40 upstream oil & gas companies to train internal technical staff. Rob holds a First Class degree in Experimental Psychology from University College, Oxford. He is a CFA Charterholder.

 

 

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                    [post_content] => The energy landscape is changing rapidly with far-reaching implications for global energy industries and actors, including oil companies and oil-exporting countries. These rapid changes introduce uncertainty in multiple dimensions, the most important of which is the speed of transition.  While the transformation of energy systems is rapid in certain regions of the world, such as Europe, the speed of global energy transition remains uncertain. It is also difficult to define the end game (which technology will win and what the final energy mix will be), as the outcome of transition will vary across regions. A key issue facing oil companies and oil-exporting countries is how they should now position themselves and how best to be part of the renewables ‘revolution’. For oil companies, moving beyond their core business is risky, but a ‘wait-and-see' strategy could be costly, therefore oil companies need to gradually ‘extend’ their business model and rather than a complete shift from hydrocarbons to renewables, they should aim to build an integrated portfolio which includes both hydrocarbon and low-carbon assets. The strategies designed to make this happen need to be flexible and able to evolve quickly in response to anticipated changes in the market. For oil-exporting countries, with subsidized prices and rising domestic energy consumption, there is no conflict between investing in renewables and in hydrocarbons as these countries can liberate oil and gas for export markets, improving the economics of renewables projects. In the long run, however, the main challenge for many oil exporting countries is economic diversification as it is the ultimate safeguard against the energy transition. Whether or not these countries succeed in their goal of achieving a diversified economy has implications for global energy markets and the speed of global energy transformations. In other words, the global energy transition will not only shape political and economic outcomes in oil-exporting countries, but the transformations in these major oil-exporting countries will, in turn, shape the global energy transition - adding another layer of uncertainty to the already complex phenomenon of energy transition.
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Latest Publications by Rob West

Latest Tweets from @OxfordEnergy

  • A review of a new OIES paper on oil market conditions and Saudi Arabia’ balancing act: The extent of dislocations i… https://t.co/n8EFPraNEj

    May 24th

  • Jonathan Stern on the latest Groningen earthquake: I think it is likely to accelerate even further the phase-out of… https://t.co/d1tGcAIAjp

    May 23rd

  • About 43% of the industrial gas demand in Europe could, in theory, decline in the 2020s as a result of decarbonizat… https://t.co/0iMqP4dCsd

    May 23rd

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