Gas and Taxes: The Impact of Russia’s Tinkering with Upstream Gas Taxes on State Revenues and Decline Rates of Legacy Gas Fields

In a world of low commodity prices the potential for conflict between hydrocarbon producers and governments over tax revenues is exacerbated. In Russia this is even more true because the state relies so heavily on taxes from the oil and gas sectors and because producers are increasingly having to invest in new more remote assets rather than rely on declining Soviet-era low-cost fields. In the gas sector the state has attempted to address this issue by offering a differentiated royalty system that allows discounted rates for new investment, but because of the oversupply of gas in Russia this has led to some unforeseen consequences. Gazprom, as the largest producer, has prioritised production from new more expensive fields with a lower tax burden rather than exploit some of its lower cost existing assets, with the result that government revenues have not been maximised and Russia’s competitive position in global market has not been optimised. This paper explores the implications of this outcome and discusses potential changes in policy which could alleviate the problems.

By: Vitaly Yermakov , Daria Kirova

Latest Tweets from @OxfordEnergy

  • A review of a new OIES paper on oil market conditions and Saudi Arabia’ balancing act: The extent of dislocations i… https://t.co/n8EFPraNEj

    May 24th

  • Jonathan Stern on the latest Groningen earthquake: I think it is likely to accelerate even further the phase-out of… https://t.co/d1tGcAIAjp

    May 23rd

  • About 43% of the industrial gas demand in Europe could, in theory, decline in the 2020s as a result of decarbonizat… https://t.co/0iMqP4dCsd

    May 23rd

Sign up for our Newsletter

Register your email address here and we will send you notification of new publications, comment, articles etc. automatically.