Electric vehicles and electricity

There is a broad consensus that penetration of electric vehicles (EVs) will rise throughout the world, but great uncertainty as to the timing and extent. There is also a growing recognition that automated, shared and electric vehicles (SAEVs) will be an important part of the coming revolution in sustainable mobility. Particularly in combination, shared mobility, automation and electric powertrains can result in major reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from transportation, as well as significantly less air pollution and greater social equality. This article adopts these views as a starting point.

The central questions addressed here are: what will determine the speed and nature of EV deployment; what barriers could slow the process; and, more specifically, could the electricity system and its regulatory regime be barriers to EV penetration, or rather assist that penetration. The focus is mainly on Europe and on passenger light-duty vehicles, including battery EVs (BEVs) and plug-in hybrid EV’s (PHEVs) in cities.

The central message is that, while electricity is obviously necessary for EV penetration, it is very unlikely to constitute a barrier to penetration, unless policy and regulation are badly designed or implemented.

By: David Robinson

Latest Tweets from @OxfordEnergy

  • OIES study on Russia’s refining system reviewed: Plans for further additions of more complex refining units have be… https://t.co/GTmB7XB5g0

    April 16th

  • New OIES paper on Russian refining sector and fuel oil exports: From 2015, as a result of new export tax policies,… https://t.co/2OFbXIbbUX

    April 15th

  • Russia’s heavy fuel oil exports: challenges and changing rules at home and abroad https://t.co/cDMQaw7xP9

    April 15th

Sign up for our Newsletter

Register your email address here and we will send you notification of new publications, comment, articles etc. automatically.