Randa Alami

Contact

WP_Query Object
(
    [query] => Array
        (
            [post_type] => publications
            [posts_per_page] => -1
            [meta_query] => Array
                (
                    [0] => Array
                        (
                            [key] => author
                            [value] => 14540
                            [compare] => LIKE
                        )

                )

        )

    [query_vars] => Array
        (
            [post_type] => publications
            [posts_per_page] => -1
            [meta_query] => Array
                (
                    [0] => Array
                        (
                            [key] => author
                            [value] => 14540
                            [compare] => LIKE
                        )

                )

            [error] => 
            [m] => 
            [p] => 0
            [post_parent] => 
            [subpost] => 
            [subpost_id] => 
            [attachment] => 
            [attachment_id] => 0
            [name] => 
            [static] => 
            [pagename] => 
            [page_id] => 0
            [second] => 
            [minute] => 
            [hour] => 
            [day] => 0
            [monthnum] => 0
            [year] => 0
            [w] => 0
            [category_name] => 
            [tag] => 
            [cat] => 
            [tag_id] => 
            [author] => 
            [author_name] => 
            [feed] => 
            [tb] => 
            [paged] => 0
            [meta_key] => 
            [meta_value] => 
            [preview] => 
            [s] => 
            [sentence] => 
            [title] => 
            [fields] => 
            [menu_order] => 
            [embed] => 
            [category__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [category__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [category__and] => Array
                (
                )

            [post__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [post__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [post_name__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag__and] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag_slug__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag_slug__and] => Array
                (
                )

            [post_parent__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [post_parent__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [author__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [author__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [ignore_sticky_posts] => 
            [suppress_filters] => 
            [cache_results] => 1
            [update_post_term_cache] => 1
            [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1
            [update_post_meta_cache] => 1
            [nopaging] => 1
            [comments_per_page] => 50
            [no_found_rows] => 
            [order] => DESC
        )

    [tax_query] => WP_Tax_Query Object
        (
            [queries] => Array
                (
                )

            [relation] => AND
            [table_aliases:protected] => Array
                (
                )

            [queried_terms] => Array
                (
                )

            [primary_table] => wp_posts
            [primary_id_column] => ID
        )

    [meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object
        (
            [queries] => Array
                (
                    [0] => Array
                        (
                            [key] => author
                            [value] => 14540
                            [compare] => LIKE
                        )

                    [relation] => OR
                )

            [relation] => AND
            [meta_table] => wp_postmeta
            [meta_id_column] => post_id
            [primary_table] => wp_posts
            [primary_id_column] => ID
            [table_aliases:protected] => Array
                (
                    [0] => wp_postmeta
                )

            [clauses:protected] => Array
                (
                    [wp_postmeta] => Array
                        (
                            [key] => author
                            [value] => 14540
                            [compare] => LIKE
                            [alias] => wp_postmeta
                            [cast] => CHAR
                        )

                )

            [has_or_relation:protected] => 
        )

    [date_query] => 
    [request] => SELECT   wp_posts.* FROM wp_posts  INNER JOIN wp_postmeta ON ( wp_posts.ID = wp_postmeta.post_id ) WHERE 1=1  AND ( 
  ( wp_postmeta.meta_key = 'author' AND wp_postmeta.meta_value LIKE '%14540%' )
) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'publications' AND (wp_posts.post_status = 'publish' OR wp_posts.post_status = 'acf-disabled') GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC 
    [posts] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 27778
                    [post_author] => 1
                    [post_date] => 2006-10-01 00:00:49
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2006-09-30 23:00:49
                    [post_content] => Like many other industries in developing countries, oil and gas (O&G) have regularly used a mixture of domestic and external finance. The financial challenges faced by the sector have rarely been about closing financing gaps because of two inherent characteristics. Firstly, O&G have been an enabling factor for developing countries wishing to access international capital markets, partly because of the industry’s strategic importance, and partly because of the implicit guarantee of income from sales. Indeed, like other extractive industries, O&G have attracted foreign investments even where and when other sectors in the host economies failed to do so. Secondly, particularly in the upstream, international oil companies (IOCs) have provided much of the capital costs required, either through in-house finance, or indirectly via their ability to access international capital markets.  International private capital tends to play a more prominent and direct role in the natural gas chain, especially in export projects.
                    [post_title] => Oil in Egypt, Oman, and Syria: Some Macroeconomic Implications
                    [post_excerpt] => 
                    [post_status] => publish
                    [comment_status] => closed
                    [ping_status] => closed
                    [post_password] => 
                    [post_name] => oil-in-egypt-oman-and-syria-some-macroeconomic-implications
                    [to_ping] => 
                    [pinged] => 
                    [post_modified] => 2016-02-29 14:10:12
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-29 14:10:12
                    [post_content_filtered] => 
                    [post_parent] => 0
                    [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/oil-in-egypt-oman-and-syria-some-macroeconomic-implications/
                    [menu_order] => 0
                    [post_type] => publications
                    [post_mime_type] => 
                    [comment_count] => 0
                    [filter] => raw
                )

            [1] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 27815
                    [post_author] => 1
                    [post_date] => 2006-04-01 00:00:35
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2006-03-31 23:00:35
                    [post_content] => In just over a decade, Egypt has become one of the largest domestic markets in Africa and amongst developing countries. Over the last 15-20 years, gas production and consumption have been moving upwards in tandem. Both stood at 6.8 billion cubic metres (bcm) in 1990, and both quadrupled respectively to 26.8 bcm and 25.7 bcm in 2004 (BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2005). Egyptian ministerial sources claim that domestic consumption rose from 22.1 bcm in 2000/01 to 30.1 bcm in 2003/04 (Ministry of Petroleum 2005), with another source claiming a higher figure of 31 bcm for 2004 (Abubakr 2005). Data discrepancies aside, Egypt has achieved a remarkable degree of gas penetration from rather modest beginnings. By comparison, older and more mature markets in Indonesia, Argentina and neighbouring Algeria consumed in 2004 33.7 bcm, 37.4 bcm and 21.2 bcm respectively (BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2005).
                    [post_title] => Egypt’s Domestic Natural Gas Industry
                    [post_excerpt] => 
                    [post_status] => publish
                    [comment_status] => closed
                    [ping_status] => closed
                    [post_password] => 
                    [post_name] => egypts-domestic-natural-gas-industry
                    [to_ping] => 
                    [pinged] => 
                    [post_modified] => 2016-02-29 14:07:00
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-29 14:07:00
                    [post_content_filtered] => 
                    [post_parent] => 0
                    [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/egypts-domestic-natural-gas-industry/
                    [menu_order] => 0
                    [post_type] => publications
                    [post_mime_type] => 
                    [comment_count] => 0
                    [filter] => raw
                )

            [2] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 27849
                    [post_author] => 1
                    [post_date] => 2005-04-01 00:00:54
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2005-03-31 23:00:54
                    [post_content] => This paper examines the interactions between recent changes in domestic and external finance in Arab countries and developments in their hydrocarbon (oil and gas) sectors. In the last two decades, countries have witnessed three major transformations in their financial and energy sectors, and in the role and size of the state. First, in line with global trends to deregulate and reform financial sectors, the regiona l financial scene has seen a double switch: from official to private sources of finance, and from external to domestic funding. In the last few years, this has taken place against a background of heightened political turmoil, which in turn has affected the mix and availability of finance. Second, to varying extents, their oil and gas sectors are being transformed by reform and restructuring, including through corporatisation or privatisation. This is in line with the third transformation, whereby pressures of economic adjustment and globalisation have redefined and resized the role of the state in the region. The involvement of Arab governments in running their economies was historically prominent, including in energy. Therefore, sectoral re-organisation falls within this broader transformation of the Arab state, but represents a more fundamental departure from the previously dominant pattern of state intervention.
                    [post_title] => Changing Financial Structures in the Arab World: Some Implications for Oil and Gas
                    [post_excerpt] => 
                    [post_status] => publish
                    [comment_status] => closed
                    [ping_status] => closed
                    [post_password] => 
                    [post_name] => changing-financial-structures-in-the-arab-world-some-implications-for-oil-and-gas
                    [to_ping] => 
                    [pinged] => 
                    [post_modified] => 2016-02-29 14:05:03
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-29 14:05:03
                    [post_content_filtered] => 
                    [post_parent] => 0
                    [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/changing-financial-structures-in-the-arab-world-some-implications-for-oil-and-gas/
                    [menu_order] => 0
                    [post_type] => publications
                    [post_mime_type] => 
                    [comment_count] => 0
                    [filter] => raw
                )

            [3] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 27861
                    [post_author] => 1
                    [post_date] => 2005-01-01 00:00:28
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2005-01-01 00:00:28
                    [post_content] => Few areas of development economics have witnessed such a sharp correction to received wisdoms in a space of a few years as has infrastructure finance. Until the 1980s, especially in developing countries, the prevailing trend had been for governments and state monopolies to assume responsibility for the provision and finance of power. By the mid-1980s, championing policies to attract private finance to power sectors took precedence, mainly on the back of two major factors. First, the disappointing ability of public entities to deliver and maintain power supplies, and secondly, fiscal pressures that undermined the availability of public funds to the sector. The commercialisation of power markets, it was hoped, would bring the dynamism and investments these markets were lacking. Indeed, many – albeit not all – developing countries received billions of dollars in infrastructural investments during the 1990s. However, several shocks put an end to this upturn and to the underlying optimism. Consequently and conversely, it is now widely accepted that privatisation and regulatory changes can be accompanied by a number of serious problems along with the funds they provide.
                    [post_title] => Financial Aspects of Arab Power Development
                    [post_excerpt] => 
                    [post_status] => publish
                    [comment_status] => closed
                    [ping_status] => closed
                    [post_password] => 
                    [post_name] => financial-aspects-of-arab-power-development
                    [to_ping] => 
                    [pinged] => 
                    [post_modified] => 2016-02-29 14:04:20
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-29 14:04:20
                    [post_content_filtered] => 
                    [post_parent] => 0
                    [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/financial-aspects-of-arab-power-development/
                    [menu_order] => 0
                    [post_type] => publications
                    [post_mime_type] => 
                    [comment_count] => 0
                    [filter] => raw
                )

        )

    [post_count] => 4
    [current_post] => -1
    [in_the_loop] => 
    [post] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 27778
            [post_author] => 1
            [post_date] => 2006-10-01 00:00:49
            [post_date_gmt] => 2006-09-30 23:00:49
            [post_content] => Like many other industries in developing countries, oil and gas (O&G) have regularly used a mixture of domestic and external finance. The financial challenges faced by the sector have rarely been about closing financing gaps because of two inherent characteristics. Firstly, O&G have been an enabling factor for developing countries wishing to access international capital markets, partly because of the industry’s strategic importance, and partly because of the implicit guarantee of income from sales. Indeed, like other extractive industries, O&G have attracted foreign investments even where and when other sectors in the host economies failed to do so. Secondly, particularly in the upstream, international oil companies (IOCs) have provided much of the capital costs required, either through in-house finance, or indirectly via their ability to access international capital markets.  International private capital tends to play a more prominent and direct role in the natural gas chain, especially in export projects.
            [post_title] => Oil in Egypt, Oman, and Syria: Some Macroeconomic Implications
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => closed
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => oil-in-egypt-oman-and-syria-some-macroeconomic-implications
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2016-02-29 14:10:12
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-29 14:10:12
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/oil-in-egypt-oman-and-syria-some-macroeconomic-implications/
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => publications
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [comment_count] => 0
    [current_comment] => -1
    [found_posts] => 4
    [max_num_pages] => 0
    [max_num_comment_pages] => 0
    [is_single] => 
    [is_preview] => 
    [is_page] => 
    [is_archive] => 1
    [is_date] => 
    [is_year] => 
    [is_month] => 
    [is_day] => 
    [is_time] => 
    [is_author] => 
    [is_category] => 
    [is_tag] => 
    [is_tax] => 
    [is_search] => 
    [is_feed] => 
    [is_comment_feed] => 
    [is_trackback] => 
    [is_home] => 
    [is_404] => 
    [is_embed] => 
    [is_paged] => 
    [is_admin] => 
    [is_attachment] => 
    [is_singular] => 
    [is_robots] => 
    [is_posts_page] => 
    [is_post_type_archive] => 1
    [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 2c95697cf9cec6cfb04fc0b895197a7c
    [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 
    [thumbnails_cached] => 
    [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => 
    [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array
        (
            [0] => query_vars_hash
            [1] => query_vars_changed
        )

    [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array
        (
            [0] => init_query_flags
            [1] => parse_tax_query
        )

)

Latest Publications by Randa Alami

Latest Tweets from @OxfordEnergy

  • New publication: India’s Gas Market Post-COP21 https://t.co/fpAWwAzvm2

    June 26th

  • New publication: Biogas: A significant contribution to decarbonising gas markets? https://t.co/Ixf81cuvGO

    June 21st

  • J Stern: UK still in EU & others have an obligation to share available supply in crisis, but post-Brexit who knows https://t.co/5lBtoznqUt

    June 21st

Sign up for our Newsletter

Register your email address here and we will send you notification of new publications, comment, articles etc. automatically.