Philip Barnes

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                    [post_content] => World oil consumption over the next twenty-five years could be almost as much as the total amount of oil produced in the entire existence of the oil industry. This high demand for what is a finite resource makes it necessary to assess where the continuing need for oil stands in relation to latest views on the size of the overall resource base and its potential utilization. This has less to do with uttering doomsday warnings than putting future technological, political and economic decisions relating to energy into their fundamental context.
                    [post_title] => The Oil Supply Mountain: Is the Summit in Sight?
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                    [post_content] => As the demand shows no sign of reduction in the rate of increase, it seems inevitable that the price must continue to rise until demand is reduced either by reduction in the number of motors used or by the introduction of other kinds of carburetting material. (Professor Vivian B. Lewes, ‘Oil fbel’, 19 13)
                    [post_title] => OIES Review of Long-Term Energy Demand
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                    [post_content] => Those who either from want of knowledge or from interested motives advocate the universal adoption of oil fuel in place of coal generally claim that it would be quite possible to supply oil of the necessary quality at 30s or 35s a ton, and that oil as a fuel is worth twice as much as coal, so that there would be an economy  n cost as well as the enormous conveniences of liquid fuel for power production. Such an idea is a mass of fallacies; the fuel oil supply is totally inadequate; there is no guarantee of a continuous supply; the price of fuel oil is now &3 a ton and over, and its value as a fuel only one and a half times that of coal; and as the general adoption of liquid fuel must be a commercial question, it is not likely that keen businessmen will Iook at oil as a general fuel as long as this country can produce coal at anything like the present price. (Professor Vivian B. Lewis FIC, FCS in ”Oil Fuel” 1913).
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                    [post_content] => This paper reviews both the potential and likely availability of dl the major forms of commercial energy over the next twenty years. It is based on assessments of potential and feasible patterns of energy supply development on a country-by country basis. These assessments take into account, amongst other elements, the resources available and the extent and realism of existing plans.
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                    [post_content] => Whenever an oil crisis occurs one can be sure that calls for the replacement of oil by other sources of energy will receive renewed attention. This is, of course, whoUy admirable and should not have to wait upon crises. The present situation in the Gulf is already giving rise to equally predictable demands for more money to be spent on various exotic alternatives to oil - generally with the taxpayers being expected to pay the bill. These alternatives, based on wind, tidal, solar power etc., are usually said to be
renewable forms of energy, as if that were merit in itself. Popularly, the renewable title is somehow taken to imply that obtaining energy from these sources will involve hardy any cost at all and that their application is wholly beneficid. Both assumptions are rather doubtful. It need only be remembered that these arguments about unlimited, benign and virtually free energy were advanced in favour of nuclear power in its early days.
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Latest Publications by Philip Barnes

Books by Philip Barnes

Latest Tweets from @OxfordEnergy

  • OIES' @thierry_bros quoted on Sonatrach changes https://t.co/C2f3RROp1q via @LesEchos

    March 27th

  • New OIES study on Russian LNG: A 12-year tax holiday + no export tax on LNG improved project economics for Yamal LN… https://t.co/HZej1LYRny

    March 24th

  • Novatek will be Russia's LNG leader while Gazprom will focus on pipeline projects, OIES via @AAEnergyNews https://t.co/JOB85QXAyc

    March 23rd

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