John Richardson

Research Associate

John Richardson is a highly experienced trainer and chemicals industry analyst, who has been working in the industry for 22 years.

Based in Asia-Pacific, John has deep knowledge of the companies and people who have transformed the region into the world’s major production and consumption region. His aim is to provide insightful, factually based analysis of the key issues facing the industry. His views are highly valued by senior executives, who appreciate his balanced and independent approach.

From 2006 until 2013, John was Director – Asia of ICIS training, in which role he successfully launched the ICIS training business in Asia. This provides a wide range of courses covering petrochemicals, oil refining, fertilisers and base oils. He now works for the ICIS Consulting team.

John has also co-authored an e-book, Boom, Gloom and the New Normal, with Paul Hodges of United Kingdom-based consultancy, International eChem. The book, which has been published by ICIS, examines how demographic factors and events in financial markets have reshaped the global economy. His Asian Chemical Connections blog has a wide regional and global readership.  John is a regular contributor to the ICIS magazine, ICIS Chemical Business and the online ICIS Insight service.

Before joining ICIS, John worked for the BBC and UK national and local newspapers.

Contact

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Latest Publications by John Richardson

Latest research by John Richardson