Christopher Joshi Hansen

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                    [post_content] => The two-decade long history of power reforms in emerging economies has returned a mix of successes and failures. Building and financing adequate new electricity generation capacity remains a persistent problem in developing countries. To address capacity shortfalls and the lack of capital available for new units, the conventional wisdom has been to create competitive electricity markets by encouraging new entry into the generation sector and by breaking up vertically integrated monopolies power companies; all with the goal of increasing power sector efficiency and investment (Joskow 1998). What began in Chile in 1980, continued in the UK and US and then prospered as a policy direction around the world has been a top-down approach that seeks to disaggregate and privatise the generation sector and create regulated private ownership in the natural monopolies of transmission and distribution.
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                    [post_content] => Climate change represents an enormous long term threat to global ecosystems and the world’s economies. The convergence of high oil prices and climate change at the top of political agendas has resurrected many of the energy policy debates of the 1970s. Advocates of different fuels each claim to have the solution, high oil prices are prompting calls for ‘urgent’ action on renewables and the role for nuclear power is back in the spotlight. At this time of increased concern about climate change and high fossil fuel costs, perhaps a new approach is needed to respond to the dual exigencies of climate change and growing electricity demand. Within this evolving and complex debate, many commentators in the media have shown a poor understanding of the different sources of energy, and which fuels provide which energy services. This note aims to breakdown the interfuel debate about electricity supply and show how cooperation might be the best tactic if carbon emissions are to be reduced while maintaining reliable electricity supply.
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                    [post_content] => At first glance, it would seem that India is now poised for its own version of the ‘dash for gas’;  high demand for electricity, aging power infrastructure, a new regulatory climate and newly discovered, large supplies of natural gas have provided a confluence of forces, which may well make gas the fuel of choice for Indian power companies.  With annual GDP growing at 8%, and electricity-sector growth normally even faster, power demand is likely to increase by more than 10% per year.  To meet this demand, a broad range of technologies and fuels are available. The long time frames for power sector capital investment means that decisions now will have long-term implications for the Indian economy and the development of a sustainable and reliable energy portfolio. This note examines the various options, and concludes that gas proponents should remain cautious in their investment approach.
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                    [post_content] => The provision of reliable electricity supply is vital to economic development in Third World nations. Apart from its important domestic and water pumping applications, electricity is a basic input into post-subsistence economic activity that allows communities to move from primary products into the processing of commodities, production of semi-finished goods and the creation of a manufacturing base. It also increases educational opportunities, improves the quality of life and permits access to information technologies. To the extent that it replaces traditional fuels, electricity improves indoor air quality, in turn leading to improved health and safety. In the long run, reliable electricity supplies connect remote rural communities to the wider manufacturing and service economies of a country.
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                    [post_title] => Political Economy of Electricity Reform: A case study in Gujarat, India
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Latest Publications by Christopher Joshi Hansen

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