Arabella Miller-Wang

OIES-Aramco Fellow

Arabella Miller-Wang is a Research Assistant at The Smith School of Enterprise and The Environment of The University of Oxford, working on a project called ‘Economics of Energy Innovation and System Transition’. This project aims to use energy models to calculate and estimate low-cost transition scenarios in different sectors and bring the research results to countries making energy transitions. Prior to Oxford, She worked as Research Associate at Chinese Renewable Energy Industries Association in Beijing, following changes to policies and markets in the field of China’s renewable energy and participating in research projects, primarily on the development of wind power in China.

Arabella completed her Ph.D. in 2020. She holds Masters and Doctoral degrees in international relations from Guangxi University for Nationalities and Macao University of Science and Technology.

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Latest Publications by Arabella Miller-Wang