Ali Aissaoui

Senior Visiting Research Fellow

Following his retirement from the Arab Petroleum Investments Corporation (APICORP), Ali Aissaoui has returned to the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies as a visiting research fellow. He is also acting as an independent consultant, providing advisory in his field of experience and expertise.

Ali has been involved in extensive research on the political economy of petroleum for many years, with a particular interest in exploring how political, institutional, socio-economic and technological factors combine to shape energy policy. During his time at APICORP, he broadened his research perspective and sharpened his focus on energy investment, investment climate, and financing across the region of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA).

In addition to informing policy decision-making, Ali regularly shares his research findings as a speaker, discussant and peer reviewer.

Ali’s involvement in relevant professional associations has provided him opportunities to interact with fellow experts and keep abreast of fast-changing global trends. In addition to the International Association for Energy Economics, he is a member of the Oxford Energy Policy Club, the Arab Energy Club, and the Paris Energy Club.

Expertise: Policy-oriented energy economics; oil and gas markets; MENA energy investment climates; energy investment and financing; political economy of the major petroleum-producing countries; NOCs roles; OPEC behaviour.

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Latest Publications by Ali Aissaoui

Books by Ali Aissaoui

Latest Tweets from @OxfordEnergy

  • OIES study quoted: Politicization of EC rules on OPAL threatens undermining credibility of EU regulatory framework https://t.co/oFDSvn9Oxq

    January 24th

  • New publication: The OPAL Exemption Decision: past, present, and future https://t.co/KpLR99qTAs

    January 23rd

  • J Stern: Gas industry needs new arguments and a credible plan for its European future https://t.co/1CFidWZOF0

    January 20th

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