Aleksandar Kovacevic

Senior Visiting Research Fellow

Aleksandar Kovacevic started his professional career in 1986 with the Federal Productivity Institute of the former Yugoslavia, having graduated with a degree in energy economics from Belgrade University. He is principal author of the energy–poverty analysis ‘Stuck in the Past’ (UNDP, 2004), co-author of the Western Balkans energy policy survey (IEA/UNDP, 2008) and the Public Expenditure and Institutional Review (PEIR) for Serbia and Montenegro (World Bank, 2003), and author of a number of papers, lectures, and media contributions. For over 20 years he has provided strategic advice, complex energy efficiency solutions, and emergency situation assistance to major institutional, financial, and private clients including assistance to UN OCHA to coordinate rapid reconstruction of the Serbian energy infrastructure after the Kosovo War. He was affiliated to PlanEcon before 1992, project manager for Tagarnrog Development project in Russia (1992–8), and a contributor to the Black Sea and Central Asia panel at the Harriman Institute, Columbia University. Aleksandar is a member of the Advisory Board to the Russian Power Conference since 2002 and ongoing, and of the UNECE Group of Experts in Sustainable Energy, as well as a regular consultant to the World Bank and contributor to the Oil and Gas Economy and Law (OGEL) network. He won an Innovation Award at the Power-Gen Europe Conference in 2002. He contributes to the Energy Community process in South Eastern Europe as well as the infrastructure development analyses in the region and climate change/economic development/security linkages. Aleksandar comments on SEE energy and transport infrastructure to international and local media.
He was involved in the drafting of major Regional Economic Development Strategy for the region with OECD, RCC, EU and other international institutions. The Strategy was adopted by Ministers of economy from the region at the beginning of 2014 and is now operational. He has also been involved in the process of reshuffling the Energy Community Treaty as well as to discussions related with the South Stream project.

Contact

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                    [post_content] => Crude and gas from the Russian Federation dominates the South Eastern Europe (SEE) import portfolio. Russian companies control oil refineries in Romania, Bulgaria, Serbia and Bosnia. Gazprom is the main gas supplier to the entire region and the only producer of domestic gas (and oil) in Serbia. Its gas export is associated with a network of subsidiaries, resellers, agents and sponsorships that are granted special rights in their respective countries of operation. This system is supported by the availability of “on demand” credit resources that contribute to the soft budget constraint and facilitate the operation of low efficiency district heating systems, emergency power generation and inefficient (fertilizer, etc.) industries. In this governance context, and if the current supply and demand structure remains, SEE will have an increased energy security risk due its exposure to a disruption in gas supply via Ukraine. In contrast, the European Union (EU) is looking toward this region as an option to improve its security of gas supply and diversify its supply portfolio. This encourages local expectations of transit rents and is based on the assumption that the region may host the following: Southern Gas Corridor, North-South Gas Interconnection and Central/South Eastern Electricity Interconnection.  There are more overlapping energy transit projects being considered than in any other region in Europe.

This paper sets out a realistic roadmap that is able to overcome existing barriers and provide the desired level of security of supply:
  1. Gas consumption that does not yield positive economic returns is to be phased out by energy efficiency, use of renewable energy and opening to international markets;
  2. Flexible Black Sea & Balkans (BS&B) Gas Hub through the improved use of existing infrastructure;
  3. BS&B Gas Hub facilitates gas trade with the rest of Europe that promotes more efficient use of gas, market opening, industrial restructuring and increased renewable energy integration – all beyond the expectations indicated in various current strategic documents.
Executive Summary [post_title] => Towards a Balkan Gas Hub: the interplay between pipeline gas, LNG and renewable energy in South East Europe [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 30072 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-06 11:34:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-06 11:34:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/?post_type=publications&p=30072 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28294 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2009-03-01 00:00:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-03-01 00:00:23 [post_content] => At the beginning of 2009, South Eastern Europe (including Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Greece, Former Yugoslav Republic (FYR) Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia and Kosovo) was simultaneously hit by three external shocks: an extended period of cold weather, disruption in natural gas supply from the Russian federation and financial crisis. [post_title] => The Impact of the Russia–Ukraine Gas Crisis in South Eastern Europe [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-impact-of-the-russia-ukraine-gas-crisis-in-south-eastern-europe-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-29 14:52:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-29 14:52:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/the-impact-of-the-russia-ukraine-gas-crisis-in-south-eastern-europe-2/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27755 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2007-03-01 00:00:24 [post_date_gmt] => 2007-03-01 00:00:24 [post_content] => South East Europe remains the most underdeveloped region in Europe in terms of energy and energy governance. The region’s energy endowment is well below the European average. It is naturally dependent on imports and limited indigenous resources such as hydro, lignite and biomass. Eventual sustainable use of these indigenous resources requires considerable improvements in governance, which is deficient throughout the region. [post_title] => The Potential Contribution of Natural Gas to Sustainable Development in South Eastern Europe [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-potential-contribution-of-natural-gas-to-sustainable-development-in-south-eastern-europe [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-29 14:11:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-29 14:11:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.oxfordenergy.org/wpcms/publications/the-potential-contribution-of-natural-gas-to-sustainable-development-in-south-eastern-europe/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publications [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 3 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30072 [post_author] => 111 [post_date] => 2017-02-06 11:33:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-06 11:33:25 [post_content] => Crude and gas from the Russian Federation dominates the South Eastern Europe (SEE) import portfolio. Russian companies control oil refineries in Romania, Bulgaria, Serbia and Bosnia. Gazprom is the main gas supplier to the entire region and the only producer of domestic gas (and oil) in Serbia. Its gas export is associated with a network of subsidiaries, resellers, agents and sponsorships that are granted special rights in their respective countries of operation. This system is supported by the availability of “on demand” credit resources that contribute to the soft budget constraint and facilitate the operation of low efficiency district heating systems, emergency power generation and inefficient (fertilizer, etc.) industries. In this governance context, and if the current supply and demand structure remains, SEE will have an increased energy security risk due its exposure to a disruption in gas supply via Ukraine. In contrast, the European Union (EU) is looking toward this region as an option to improve its security of gas supply and diversify its supply portfolio. This encourages local expectations of transit rents and is based on the assumption that the region may host the following: Southern Gas Corridor, North-South Gas Interconnection and Central/South Eastern Electricity Interconnection.  There are more overlapping energy transit projects being considered than in any other region in Europe. This paper sets out a realistic roadmap that is able to overcome existing barriers and provide the desired level of security of supply:
  1. Gas consumption that does not yield positive economic returns is to be phased out by energy efficiency, use of renewable energy and opening to international markets;
  2. Flexible Black Sea & Balkans (BS&B) Gas Hub through the improved use of existing infrastructure;
  3. BS&B Gas Hub facilitates gas trade with the rest of Europe that promotes more efficient use of gas, market opening, industrial restructuring and increased renewable energy integration – all beyond the expectations indicated in various current strategic documents.
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Latest Publications by Aleksandar Kovacevic

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